Claudius tells Laertes that he must know that Claudius is innocent in Polonius’s death, because “he which hath your noble father slain / pursued my life” (IV.vii.4-5). Unsuspectingly placing his trust in Claudius’ plea that “you must put me in your heart for friend… he which hath your noble father slain / Pursued my life,” Laertes lacks the precarious nature that prevents Hamlet from immediate action, as he takes the king’s words for granted and overlooks the king’s possible personal motives (IV.7.2-5). I will … Now must your conscience my acquaintance seal, And you must put me in your heart for friend, Sith you have heard, and with a knowing ear, That he which hath your noble father slain. Your better wisdoms, which have freely gone With this affair along. That he which hath your noble father slain Pursued my life.

Now follows, that you know, young Fortinbras, Holding a weak supposal of our worth, Or thinking by our late dear brother's death Our state to be disjoint and out of frame, Colleagued with this dream of his advantage, He hath not fail'd to pester us with message

Laertes. LAERTES. It well appears: but tell me. It wasn’t Claudius’ fault Polonius was killed “You must put me in your heart for friend, Sith you have heard, and with a knowing ear, The he which hath your noble father slain Pursued my life” (IV.vii.2-5).

But tell me Why you proceeded not against these feats, So criminal and so capital in nature, As by your safety, greatness, wisdom, all things else, You mainly were stirred up.
[10] KING O, for two special reasons, Which may to you perhaps seem much unsinewed, But yet to me they're strong. For all, our thanks. He, being remiss, Most generous, and free from all contriving, 3280 Will not peruse the foils; so that with ease, Or with a little shuffling, you may choose A sword unbated, and, in a pass of practice, Requite him for your father. She "Lives almost by his [Hamlet's] looks" (4.7.12). Laertes has just one more question: Why didn't the King bring Hamlet to account for the murder? The first is that he loves Gertrude, and Gertrude loves her son.

“I am guiltless of your father’s death, And am most sensibly in grief for it” (IV.v.147-148). Not only did Hamlet kill Polonius, but "he which hath your noble father slain / Pursued my life" (4.7.4-5). (77) King: Now must your conscience my acquittance seal, And you must put me in your heart for friend, Sith you have heard, and with a knowing ear, That … The King has two reasons.

And wager on your heads.
Now must your conscience my acquittance seal, And you must put me in your heart for Friend, Sith you haue heard, and with a knowing eare, That he which hath your Noble Father slaine, Pursued my life Laer.

[5] LAERTES It well appears.

Pursued my life.