Visits to colonies can be very popular: the northern royal albatross colony at Taiaroa Head in Dunedin, New Zealand, attracts 40,000 visitors a year, and more isolated colonies are regular attractions on cruises to subantarctic islands. The Northern Royal Albatross chick hatched in an incubator on January 31 and is now back in the nest and under the care of its parents.
The royal albatrosses nest only on New Zealand's sub-Antarctic islands, with one unusual colony on New Zealand's Otago Peninsula.

They breed in colonies on remote islands, although the colony established at Taiaroa Head on Otago Peninsula (New Zealand) is the only mainland albatross colony in the world.

Albatross Information. Around 35 pairs breed each year at Taiaroa Head, including five hybrids (descended from cross with female Southern Royal Albatross D. epomophora).

(Read on for links to highlight clips from this process.) There are two species of royal albatross, southern and northern.
Northern Royal Albatross Diomedea sanfordi Check out the full taxonomy and distribution of Northern Royal Albatross on HBW Alive. Northern Royal Albatross Cam Northern Royal Albatross Cam at Taiaroa Head near Dunedin, New Zealand Source: New Zealand Dept. The Northern Royal Albatross is known to hybridise with the Southern Royal Albatross D. epomophora.

New; 2:37. With the help of over 7,000 of the world’s best wildlife filmmakers and photographers, conservationists and scientists, Arkive.org featured multi-media fact-files for more than 16,000 endangered species. 10,000 seabirds also thrive at Pukekura/Taiaroa Head, including nationally vulnerable and threatened species like red-billed gulls and Otago shags. Systematics and evolution. The Northern Royal Albatross or Toroa, Diomedea sanfordi, is a large seabird from the albatross family.. Description. Facts Summary: The Northern Royal Albatross (Diomedea sanfordi) is a species of concern belonging in the species group "birds" and found in the following area(s): Africa, Australia, French Southern Territories, Heard Island and McDonald Islands, Oceans, South America, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands.This species is also known by the following name(s): Toroa. The nest is typically a low mound of vegetation, mud, feathers, stone chips etc, on flat ground and slopes on islands and headlands.

1999) and grasses. Genus Diomedea - Great albatrosses. The Northern Royal Albatross or Toroa, Diomedea sanfordi, is a large seabird from the albatross family. The Royal Albatross Centre is operated by the Otago Peninsula Trust, New Zealand’s first private charitable conservation trust. The northern royal albatross or toroa, Diomedea sanfordi, is a large seabird from the albatross family.It was split from the closely related southern royal albatross as recently as 1998, though not all scientists support that conclusion and consider both of them to be subspecies of the royal albatross. At close range, note the diagnostic narrow black “lips” on bill, lacking on Wandering. It has a wingspan of 270 to 305 cm and weighs 6.2 to 8.2 kg. It was split from the closely related Southern Royal Albatross as recently as 1998, though not all scientists support that conclusion and consider both of them to be subspecies of the Royal Albatross.. Wildscreen's Arkive project was launched in 2003 and grew to become the world's biggest encyclopaedia of life on Earth. However, since the estimate of 17,000 mature individuals is based on data from multiple years, this is the estimate used here. A proportion of every ticket sold at the centre goes directly towards the fostering and protection of the Northern Royal Albatross. The southern royal albatross (toroa) is one of the great albatross species, with a wing-span in excess of 3 m and weighing approximately 9 kg.Endemic to New Zealand, the majority of the southern royal breeding population is found on subantarctic Campbell Island, with … Habitat Breeding Northern Royal Albatrosses usually nest on the flat summits of tiny islands with herb fields (G. A. Taylor in litt. It roughly equates to 25,000-26,000 individuals in total. Criteria: A4bc; B2ab(iii,v) Click here for more information about the Red List categories and criteria Justification of Red List category This species is classified as Endangered because it is restricted to a small breeding range in which severe storms in the 1980s resulted in a decrease in habitat quality and poor breeding success.