Nicknamed “Lady Day” by her friend and musical partner Lester Young, Holiday had a seminal influence on jazz and pop singing. Billie Pt 2 – 1940s – Podcast clip A.mp3 She had no formal musical training, but, with an instinctive sense of musical structure and a deep knowledge of jazz and blues , she developed a singing style that was deeply moving and individual. 13. John Chilton, Billie’s Blues: The Billie Holiday Story, 1933-1959, New York: Da Capo Press, 1989.

Nicknamed “Lady Day” by her friend and musical partner Lester Young, Holiday had a seminal influence on jazz and pop singing. In an extract from his history of protest songs, Dorian Lynskey explores the power of Strange Fruit Holiday's version of the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1978. Artist: Song Title: Year: Chart Entries: 1: Billie Holiday: Strange Fruit: 1939: Grammy Hall of Fame in 1978 (1939), Library of Congress artifact added 2002 (1939), nuTsie 7 of 1930s, US Billboard 16 - 1939 (2 weeks), Music Imprint 18 of 1940s, Scrobulate 25 of jazz, Europe 92 of the 1930s (1939), Acclaimed 180 (1939), RIAA 273, WXPN 717, Visconti song of 1939, RYM 2 of 1939, Guardian Jazz 12 In the songs she recorded during this period, her legendary voice is strong and pure, undiminished by the ravages of … Lady Day and Pres (they bestowed the nicknames on each other) recorded some 60 sides together between 1937 and 1946, many if not all of which have to be considered classics.

Songs from Broadway musicals were also gaining traction, especially songs by legendary composer Irving Berlin. She imparted unprecedented emotional depth to ballads, blues, torch songs and her own striking originals. Eleanora Fagan (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), professionally known as Billie Holiday, was an American jazz singer with a career spanning nearly thirty years.

Complete song listing of Billie Holiday on OLDIES.com.

The popular music of the 1930’s and 1940’s was jazz, big band, country, folk, blues, latin and “the crooners” who sang popular songs accompanied by an orchestra or jazz band, such as Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett etc. "Strange Fruit" is a song performed most famously by Billie Holiday. Billie Holiday's 1939 song about racist lynchings redefined popular music. Find album reviews, stream songs, credits and award information for 1939-1940 - Billie Holiday on AllMusic - 1996 - This volume of the Classics Chronological series…

Her vocal style, strongly inspired by jazz instrumentalists, pioneered a new way of manipulating phrasing and tempo. Even early in her career, Holiday’s youthful voice shows range and flexibility on this track.

Billie Holiday Songs. 5 R&B [Decca 23391] written by Jimmy Davis, Jimmy Sherman & Roger Ramirez During the 1940s Billie Holiday (Eleanora Fagan, 1915-1959) emerged as a fully formed artist, her voice at its richest and most expressive. It condemned American racism, particularly the lynching of African Americans that had occurred chiefly in the South but also in all regions of the United States.

I'm a Fool to Want You Written - By - Sinatra*, J. Wolf, Herron [3:27] Around 1930, Holiday began singing in local clubs and renamed herself "Billie" after the film star Billie Dove. Chicago became the jazz capital and vocalists like Billie Holiday soon grabbed the spotlight. Billie Holiday’s real-name was Eleanora Harris (born April 7, 1915 – died July 17, 1959) was an American jazz singer and songwriter.

Billie Holiday wurde vor der Annahme ihres Künstlernamens meist Eleanora Fagan genannt, auch wenn ihre Geburtsurkunde den Namen Elionora Harris aufweist. Billie Holiday was one of the greatest jazz singers from the 1930s to the ’50s. In accordance with the generous wishes of William Gottlieb, the photographs in the William P. Gottlieb Collection entered into the public domain on February 16, 2010. Billie Holiday’s real-name was Eleanora Harris (born April 7, 1915 – died July 17, 1959) was an American jazz singer and songwriter. Robert O’Meally, Lady Day: The Many Faces of Billie Holiday, New York: Da Capo Press, 1991.