↩︎ The New York Times Comparing social studies textbooks customized for California and Texas illuminates America’s deepest partisan divides. Allow me a moment’s fun on this. If you're interested in watching a good documentary about how Texas's textbooks are developed (and the impact those decisions have outside of the state), check out The Revisionaries. January 12, 2020 at 2:12 pm EST By Taegan Goddard Leave a Comment. In California, you get a salad filled with the freshest fruit and vegetables. No matter where you live, if your children go to public schools, the textbooks they use were very possibly written under Texas influence. In Texas, you get barbecue beef, Texas toast and hot peppers, which is as close as you get to a healthy vegetable. You live longer just by looking at it. New York Times: “The textbooks cover the same sweeping story, from the brutality of slavery to the struggle for civil rights. Texas does not. California and Texas are the most populous states. Texas’s relative success is best measured against a peer: California. Posted January 12 by spit-evil-olive-tips. The self-evident truths of the founding documents to the waves of immigration that reshaped the nation.” “The books have the same publisher. Both California and Texas have tens of millions of residents (who are mostly minorities), booming economies, and the large markets for textbook publishers. Both Texas and California volumes deal more bluntly with the cruelty of the slave trade, eschewing several myths that were common in textbooks for generations: that some slave owners treated enslaved people kindly and that African-Americans were better off enslaved than free. That is not leftist revisionism. Still, recent textbooks have come a long way from what was published in past decades. California and Texas textbooks sometimes offer different explanations for white backlash to black advancement after the Civil War, from Reconstruction to … That fear has already stoked a political backlash: One California state senator is drafting legislation to keep any hint of the Texas version of U.S. history out of California textbooks. Despite all the handwringing about Texas' influence on the textbook market nationally, it's just not so, publishing insiders say.

Both California and Texas have tens of millions of residents (who are mostly minorities), booming economies, and the large markets for textbook publishers. Textbooks. Because of that, each state’s politics affects social studies curriculum across the …

§ 5000A) that created a tax penalty for Americans without insurance was eliminated. But one’s a blue state, and the other is red. You may not live as long, but you’ll have more fun eating. California and Texas: Same textbooks, different history lessons. California is critical of wealth inequality and the impact of companies like Standard Oil on the environment. California Moves To Block Texas' Textbook ... My understanding was that this bill was intended to prevent the specific changes proposed by Texas from making it into California textbooks. … California v. Texas (Docket 19-840) is a pending case before the United States Supreme Court dealing with the constitutionality of the 2010 Affordable Care Act following the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.With this law, the "individual mandate" (26 U.S.C. Over the weekend, my colleague Dana Goldstein published an in-depth analysis of American history textbooks used in California and Texas schools. California vs. Texas is a true culture clash of titans. But one’s a... 9 min, 49 sec